Black History Month

A Right Worth the Fight

2020 Black History Month Celebration

A Right Worth the Fight

The struggle to secure voting rights for African Americans begins nor ends with the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  Since being designated as three-fifths of a person in the Constitution, people of African descent have influenced the power of the vote, whether by property or their own citizenship. Despite poll taxes, literacy tests, fraud, and intimidation, African Americans have labored and fought to make their voices heard to turn the tide of American political opinion. Join the James Farmer Multicultural Center as we celebrate the stories of tragedy and triumph of African Americans in this nation.

 

Gospelfest
Saturday, Feb. 1 | 3 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Join gospel choirs and praise dance teams from several Virginia colleges and universities as they engage in spiritual song and dance.

 

Farmer Film Series
Monday, Feb. 3 | 6 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

In honor of the Farmer Legacy 2020: A Centennial Celebration and Commitment to Action, there will be a series of films highlighting the life and contributions of the late great Dr. James L. Farmer Jr. The first film that will be shown in the Farmer Film Series is the 2007 film, The Great Debaters.

 

Black History Month Kick-Off Dinner: Caribbean Dinner
Tuesday, February 4 |  5 p.m. | Dining at the Top of the UC, University Center
Co-sponsored by Campus Dining

Cost: 1 meal swipe, Cash/Credit/EagleOne $12.50 + tax

 

The Continuing Fight for the Voting Rights Act
Tuesday, Feb. 4 | 6 p.m.  |  Chandler Ballroom C, University Center 

In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the definitive achievement of Civil Rights Movement, the Voting Rights Act. Since then, sections of the Act have come under scrutiny allowing for its controversial dilution. This program will be a conversation on the impact and continued fight to maintain the vitality of the Voting Rights Act. Presenters include representatives from the Fredericksburg City Council, OneVirginia 2021, and the UMW Political Science Department.

 

Jazz Ensemble Black History Tribute:  Iconic Jazz Greats
Wednesday, Feb. 5 | 6 p.m. | The Underground, Lee Hall

Celebrate Black History Month with the UMW Jazz Ensemble! Doug Gately, a senior lecturer in the Department of Music, directs this concert featuring music from iconic jazz artists.

 

Black Minds Matter
Thursday, Feb. 6 | 6 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

This event will provide education on diversity in mental health. There will be an open dialogue and discussion regarding the idea that mental health is a problem every community encounters and why the stigma behind it should end. Helpful resources will be provided.

 

Queen & Slim
Friday, Feb. 7 | 10 p.m. | Monroe Hall, Room 116
Saturday, Feb. 8 | 7 p.m. | Monroe Hall, Room 116

Sponsored by Campus Programming Board

Cost: $1.00

 

The History of Hip-Hop and the Art of DJing in the South and West Coast
Monday, Feb. 10 | 6 p.m.  | Chandler Ballroom C, University Center

 This interactive presentation will be led by world famous DJs, DJ Demp and DJ R-Tistic. This duo will take the audience on an oral and visual tour of the history of hip-hop in the South and West Coast, respectively. During their presentation, they will showcase their deejaying skills to highlight the artistry that defines the foundation of hip-hop and how the usage of sampling contributed to the popularity of the South and West coast trademark sounds.

 

Black History Month: Southern Soul Food Lunch
Tuesday, February 11  |  11:30 a.m. | Dining at the Top of the UC, University Center
Co-sponsored by Campus Dining

Cost: 1 meal swipe, Cash/Credit/EagleOne $9.65 + tax

 

The Harlem Renaissance at 100
Tuesday, Feb. 11 | 6 p.m. | Chandler Ballroom A&B, University Center

This event will provide education on the social and artistic explosion known as the Harlem Renaissance. Beginning in 1920, Harlem, NY became the black cultural mecca in the United States. This period is considered one of the golden ages in African American culture. Danny Tweedy, associate professor in the department of English, Linguistics, and Communication, will reflect on the literature, music, and art of the period.

 

Black History Month Keynote Speaker: Etan Thomas
Wednesday, Feb. 12 | 7 p.m. | Chandler Ballroom C, University Center

Etan Thomas is a prolific author of poetry, nonfiction books, and articles. His 2018 work, We Matter: Athletes and Activism, is one of Book Authority’s Top Ten best activism books of all time. The African-American Literary Awards named it a best nonfiction book for 2018. Thomas received the 2010 National Basketball Players Association Community Contribution Award for social justice and the 2009 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Foundation Legacy Award. He writes for The Guardian and is seen on MSNBC and ESPN as a special correspondent. He also co-hosts a radio show, The Collision, where sports and politics intersect.

Colors of Africa
Saturday, Feb. 15 | 6 p.m. | Chandler Ballroom, University Center
Sponsored by the African Student Union and the James Farmer Multicultural Center

Colors of Africa seeks to celebrate the culture that Black people create. Whether it is Black people of the African continent, African Americans, or the Caribbean, Blackness is a transnational and multicultural experience and it ought to be celebrated as such.

Farmer Film Series
Monday, Feb. 17 | 6 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

In honor of the Farmer Legacy 2020: A Centennial Celebration and Commitment to Action, there will be a series of films highlighting the life and contributions of the late great Dr. James L. Farmer Jr. The second film that will be shown in the Farmer Film Series is the 2009 documentary, The Good Fight.

Black History Month Dinner: African Cuisines Dinner
Tuesday, February 18 |  5 p.m. | Dining at the Top of the UC, University Center
Co-sponsored by Campus Dining

Cost: 1 meal swipe, Cash/Credit/EagleOne $12.50 + tax

Human Rights Film Series:  Something in the Water
Wednesday, Feb. 19 | 6 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

Actor/Activist Rosario Dawson investigates how the Flint Water Crisis affected Michigan citizens.

 

School Daze Film & Discussion
Thursday, Feb. 20 | 6 p.m. | Monroe Hall, Room 116

There will be a showing of the Spike Lee film, School Daze, with a discussion afterward regarding the topics covered in the film.

Step Show
Saturday, Feb. 22 | 7 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

UMW IDs: $5 at the door.
General Public: $10 at the door. (Note: Debit/Credit Cards Not Accepted)
Methods of Payment: Cash, Eagle One Card, Cash App, Pay Pal, or Venmo

Advanced tickets sales will be available from Feb. 17 – Feb. 19 only. You may purchase them in the 2nd floor lobby of the University Center. Sales will take place each day from:
11 am – 1 pm
5 pm – 7 pm
Methods of Payment: Cash, Eagle One Card, Cash App, Pay Pal, or Venmo

Group ticket sales will be available beginning Wednesday, February 12.
These sales must have at least 10 tickets at $5 per ticket. You must purchase these tickets on campus at the James Farmer Multicultural Center from 9 am – 4 pm. The JFMC is located in the University Center, room 319.
Method of Payment: Cash or Money Order Only

Join Greek step teams from regional colleges and universities as they engage in a high-energy, entertaining competition.

Farmer Film Series
Monday, Feb. 24 | 6 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

In honor of the Farmer Legacy 2020: A Centennial Celebration and Commitment to Action, there will be a series of films highlighting the life and contributions of the late great Dr. James L. Farmer Jr. The last film that will be shown in the Farmer Film Series is the 2010 film, Freedom Riders.

Black History Month:  Creole/Cajun Mardi Gras Lunch
Tuesday, February 25  |  11:30 a.m.  | Dining at the Top of the UC, University Center
Co-sponsored by Campus Dining

Cost: 1 meal swipe, Cash/Credit/EagleOne $9.65 + tax

The Freedom Rides Reflections
Tuesday, Feb. 25 | 6:30 p.m.  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

This program will feature students and community members who participated in the Social Justice Fall Break trip, where they traveled along the same route as the original 1961 Freedom Riders. They will be reflecting on their experiences and Dr. James Farmer’s legacy.

Rick Bell Lecture: Stolen
Wednesday, Feb. 26 | 7 p.m.  |  Lee Hall, Room 411

Author Rick Bell will present a lecture on his recent book, Stolen. It is a gripping and true story about five boys who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice, reminiscent of Twelve Years a Slave and Never Caught.

Great Lives Series: Frederick Douglass
Thursday, Feb. 27 | 7:30 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Pulitzer Prize winner, Yale professor David Blight author of Frederick Douglass: Profit of Freedom will speak on the life of Frederick Douglass.


All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For more information, please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center at 540/654-1044 or visit www.students.umw.edu/multicultural.