JFMC Human Rights Film Series

James Farmer Multicultural Center
Human Rights Film Series 2018-2019

As part of our ongoing commitment to social justice and honoring the legacy of Dr. James Farmer, the James Farmer Multicultural Center proudly presents the Human Rights Film Series.   The Human Rights Film Series features films and documentaries dealing with issues and topics such as the rights of undocumented immigrants, the struggles of indigenous peoples to reclaim their cultures, and the crucial and significant role women played during the Civil Rights Movement.

All film screenings will be free and open to the public. For more information, please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center at 540/654-1044 or via email at umwjfmc@gmail.com.

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Admissions:  Student Stories from Undocumented America
Wednesday, September 26  |  6 pm  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

Admissions delves into the inherent contradictions and psychological implications of undocumented students trapped at the intersection of education policy and broken immigration system. The stories of four students demonstrate both the dehumanizing effects of marginalization and their determination to receive a higher education. An experimental sound design, unsynchronized imagery, and a sophisticated metaphorical language are used to tell their poignant narratives—Jong Min discovering why he can’t find his green card, Viridiana buying fake papers with her mother, Chariles’s desire to study philosophy while picking strawberries, and Blanca’s identity crisis when she returns to Mexico speaking “like a gringa.” Admissions creates a space of dialogue and  create awareness of the complex issues of immigration, education and belonging.


More Than a Word:  Native American-Based Sports Mascots
Monday, November 12  |  6pm  |  Colonnade Room

An exploration of Native American-based mascots, especially the Washington R_dskins, and their impact on real-life attitudes, issues, and policies. Through interviews with scholars, tribal leaders, lawyers, policy experts, activists, and Washington R_dskins fans, the film explores the history of the slanderous term “redskin,” and delves into cultural stereotypes of Native Americans and their relationship to history. Ultimately, the film argues for representations that honor and celebrate the humanity of Indigenous people.

John Little and Kenn Little, co-filmmakers and brothers, are both enrolled members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Together, they are writing Indigenous people into the historical and cultural narrative.

“MORE THAN A WORD makes crystal clear that the fight against Indian mascots is a central part of the wider struggle of Indigenous people for political, educational, and socio-economic justice today. From the Washington football team to Standing Rock, this important documentary shows that Indigenous activism and artistry are alive and well, and getting stronger by the day. – Kevin Bruyneel, Professor of Politics, Babson College


 

The Black Panthers:  Vanguard of the Revolution
Monday, February 4 |  6pm  |  Colonnade Room, University Center

In the turbulent 1960s, change was coming to America and the fault lines could no longer be ignored — cities were burning, Vietnam was exploding, and disputes raged over equality and civil rights. A new revolutionary culture was emerging and it sought to drastically transform the system. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense would, for a short time, put itself at the vanguard of that change.  The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution is the first feature-length documentary to explore the Black Panther Party, its significance to the broader American culture, its cultural and political awakening for black people, and the painful lessons wrought when a movement derails.

Master documentarian Stanley Nelson goes straight to the source, weaving a treasure trove of rare archival footage with the diverse group of voices of the people who were there: police, FBI informants, journalists, white supporters and detractors, and Black Panthers who remained loyal to the party and those who left it.

Featuring Kathleen Cleaver, Jamal Joseph, Ericka Huggins, and dozens of others, as well as archival footage of the late Huey P. Newton and Eldridge Cleaver, The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution tells the story of a pivotal movement that gave rise to a new revolutionary culture in America.  Their causes, with slogans like “power to the people” and “creating a better world” are relevant again in an era that has seen the rise of the “Black Lives Matter” movement and tense relations between African American communities and the police. The Black Panthers condemnations of injustice, oppression and brutality in the late ’60s and early ’70s reverberate again in one city after another.


CODE:  Debugging the Gender Gap
Wednesday, March 20  |  6pm  |  Lee Hall, Room 412

Tech jobs are growing three times faster than our colleges are producing computer science graduates. By 2020, there will be one million unfilled software engineering jobs in the USA. Through compelling interviews, artistic animation and clever flashpoints in popular culture, CODE documentary examines the reasons why more girls and people of color are not seeking opportunities in computer science and explores how cultural mindsets, stereotypes, educational hurdles and sexism all play roles in this national crisis. Expert voices from the worlds of tech, psychology, science, and education are intercut with inspiring stories of women who are engaged in the fight to challenge complacency in the tech industry and have their voices heard. CODE aims to inspire change in mindsets, in the educational system, in startup culture and in the way women see themselves in the field of coding.


 

For more information please contact the James Farmer Multicultural Center at 540-654-1044 or email umwjfmc@gmail.com.