Black History Month Celebration

Black History Month Celebration 2014

“With Our Minds Set on Freedom: Advancing Justice, Realizing the Dream”

2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. Passage of the act opened the door for women and racial and ethnic minorities to have fair access to employment opportunities. The act also ended Jim Crow laws enforcing racial segregation in public facilities. Passage of the act was a victory for the thousands of Americans who campaigned, marched, protested, boycotted, and devoted or even risked their lives in the cause of equality. The passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 continued the movement.

Reflection about the legal and social victories accomplished during the civil rights movement evokes reflection about the present state of equality and justice in the United States. As we face similar issues today, how do we continue to advance justice and realize the dream? Join the James Farmer Multicultural Center and the Black History Month Planning Committee as we examine past and present efforts to achieve freedom and equality for all.

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Black History Month Kickoff Celebration: Gospelfest

Saturday, Feb. 1 | 3 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Co-sponsored by Voices of Praise and UMW Praise Dance Team.

Join UMW’s Voices of Praise and Praise Dance Team as they celebrate the African-American cultural tradition of spiritual uplift through song and dance. Gospel choirs and praise dance teams from several Virginia colleges and universities will perform.

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Dinner: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 3 | 5-7  p.m. | Seacobeck Hall

Cost: one meal-plan meal for students, $5 for UMW faculty and staff, $10.75 (plus tax) for community members

Campus Dining will feature African cuisine.

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Film and Discussion: An Ordinary Hero

Monday, Feb. 3 | 7  p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

An Ordinary Hero recounts the life of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, an unlikely advocate and activist for racial desegregation. Mulholland, a Southern white teenager from a privileged family believed that segregation was morally and religiously wrong and vowed to be instrumental in ending it. By the time Mulholland was 19 years old, she had participated in over three dozen sit-ins and protests and later was put on death row in Mississippi for participating in the Freedom Rides. Join Jane Mulholland and the film’s director (and Jane’s son), Loki Mulholland, as they share her amazing and inspirational life story.

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Great Lives Lecture: Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, Feb. 4 | 7:30  p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

David Garrow, research professor of history and law at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Law and author of Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, will speak about the political education of Martin Luther King Jr.

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Civil War to Civil Rights: Trail to Freedom Teacher Resources Toolkit

Thursday, Feb. 6 | 7  p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

Sponsored by the James Monroe Museum and the Trail to Freedom Group.

Tramia Jackson, the director of education and public programs for the Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center, and Eric Powell, instructional coordinator for Post Oak Middle School, will discuss the Trail to Freedom Group and the Trail to Freedom Teacher Resources Toolkit. The Trail to Freedom Teachers Resource Kit tells the story of the African American struggle for freedom and equal rights through local stories from Fredericksburg and surrounding counties.

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Film: The Butler

Friday, Feb. 7 | 7  p.m. | Monroe Hall, room 116

Saturday, Feb. 8 | 10  p.m. | Monroe Hall, room 116

Sunday, Feb. 9 | 2  p.m. | Monroe Hall, room 116

Sponsored by UMW Cheap Seats Cinema. $1 general admission.

Cecil Gaines serves eight presidents as a White House butler, while the civil rights movement, Vietnam, and other events affect his life, his family, and American society.

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Dinner: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 10 | 5-7  p.m. | Seacobeck Hall

Cost: one meal-plan meal for students, $5 for UMW faculty and staff, $10.75 (plus tax) for community members

Campus Dining will feature Caribbean cuisine.

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Black History Month Keynote Speaker: Angela Rye

Wednesday, Feb. 12 | 7 p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

**Rescheduled due to inclement weather**

Monday, February 24 | 7 p.m. | Monroe Hall, room 116

a.rye 1Angela Rye is Principal at IMPACT Strategies and has been recognized as one of the most dynamic, young leaders on Capitol Hill.  She has been featured on MSNBC, TV One, C-SPAN, BET, as well as in The Root 100, MSNBC’s “BLTWY Power List: 35 under 35 Who Changed DC”, the Washington Post “Who Runs Gov”, and recognized as one of DC’s Most Influential.  In 2011, Rye became the youngest woman Executive Director and first General Counsel to the Congressional Black Caucus.  In her role as Executive Director, Rye was tasked with developing the overall legislative and political strategy for the CBC.

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Musical Performance: Levi Stephens

Wednesday, Feb. 12 | 8  p.m. | Lee Hall, the Underground

This D.C.-born singer-songwriter blends many musical genres, from rock to gospel to folk, but his voice remains grounded in soul. Levi’s musical roots were in church, and his influences include Stevie Wonder, Paul Simon, and James Taylor.

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Performance: A Freedom Story **Cancelled*

Thursday, Feb. 13 | 7:30  p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Join members the Alter Egos Step Team, Voices of Praise, Praise Dance Ministry, and more as they use song and dance to represent African Americans’ struggles and triumphs to achieve freedom and equality.

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Lunch: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 17 | 11:30 am-1:30  p.m. | Seacobeck Hall

Cost: one meal-plan meal for students, $5 for UMW faculty and staff, $8.35 (plus tax) for community members

Campus Dining will feature Southern soul food.

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Lecture: African Sovereignty in the British Atlantic World

Monday, Feb. 17 | 4  p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

Sponsored by the Department of English, Linguistics, and Speech.

Catherine Molineux, associate professor of history at Vanderbilt University is a historian of culture in the early modern British Atlantic world, with a focus on race, slavery, and empire. She is the author of Faces of Perfect Ebony: Encountering Atlantic Slavery in Imperial Britain. Her lecture derives from themes from her book and research conducted in the United Kingdom and Sierra Leone.

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Lecture: “Let Me Loosen Up My Bra Strap”: Black Female Sexual Agency in Contemporary Film and Literature

Tuesday, Feb. 18 | 7  p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

Sponsored by Women’s and Gender Studies.

Dr. Kimberly Brown, associate professor and chair of the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and author of Writing the Revolutionary Diva: Black Women’s Subjectivity and the Decolonized Text, will discuss the representation of black female sexuality in film and literature.

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Panel Discussion: Restoration of Voter Rights

Thursday, Feb. 20 | 6  p.m. | Lee Hall, room 411

Sponsored by the James Farmer Multicultural Center and Virginia Organizing.

The panelists will discuss Virginia’s laws that prohibit convicted felons from voting. The panelists, several of whom have been directly affected by this law, will address the history of disenfranchisement in Virginia, the effects these laws have on Virginia’s residents, and ways to work toward equal voting rights in Virginia.

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24th Annual Step Show Competition

Saturday, Feb. 22 | 7 p.m. | Dodd Auditorium, George Washington Hall

Doors open at 6:30 p.m

Cost: $5 general admission/at the door, $2 UMW students, faculty, and staff pre-sale.
 
Co-sponsored by the Black Student Association and Women of Color.
 

Stepping began in the early 1900′s.  Today, the dance form uses the entire body to resonate complex rhythmic beats and sounds.  Area step teams engage in a high-energy, entertaining competition.

 
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Dinner: Cuisines of Black Cultures

Monday, Feb. 24 | 5-7  p.m. | Seacobeck Hall

Cost: one meal-plan meal for students, $5 for UMW faculty and staff, $10.75 (plus tax) for community members
Campus Dining will feature Creole and Cajun cuisine.-

An Evening of Jazz: A Tribute to America’s Great Black Artists

Wednesday, Feb. 26 | 7:30  p.m. | Lee Hall, the Underground

Co-sponsored by the UMW Department of Music.
 

The UMW Faculty Jazz Ensemble will feature works by legendary African-American jazz musicians.-